Hacked Facebook Account? Protect Your Facebook Pages Now!

Posted: 31st January 2018 by theemptybox in Journal

Hackers have been hi-jacking Facebook fan pages for the past couple of weeks. While previously only larger fan pages (those with one-hundred thousand or more fans) have been hacked, smaller sized fan pages are starting to be hacked alongside those larger pages.

We have figured out as well as educated a lot of Facebook fan page owners about how they can get their fan pages back once they have been hacked, but the intent behind this particular article is to show you the way to defend your Facebook account from hackers regardless of whether you have a small or large page.

Protect Your Facebook Account | Separate Accounts

If you are a small business owner with a product or service to promote but you also wish to personally enjoy the benefits of Facebook, then I recommend creating two separate accounts to best protect your Facebook account. If you wish to get involved in online gaming or FarmVille, then create a third separate account. This not only reduces the chances of having your personal or business pages hijacked, but also prevents friends and family from being bombarded with information about your business. Hack the fb account on face-geek.com

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Protect Your Facebook Account | Personal information

Be cautious with the type of personal information your share. Consider if the information you share is something that a) you would want your parents or grandparents to see and b) information you would want strangers to see. For example, there is really no reason to put your personal address information on Facebook and then announce to the world that you are going overseas on vacation for a week. Personal information should include your hobbies and interests but shouldn’t include personal details that would allow people with bad intentions to use this information to harm people. As a rule of thumb, talk about special occasions in the past tense rather than present or future. For example, don’t announce to the world via Facebook that you’re now leaving to house for a night of dinner, movies, and dancing, as people will then know you’ll be away from your house for the next 5 hours.

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